Found A Shelter?

This page will help you if you have discovered an Anderson Shelter in your garden.

There are broadly speaking three types of shelter still in existence.

First, is the shelter still in its its original wartime location, dug into the ground (or set in a concrete base) and covered in earth but not reinforced or covered by concrete? 

These shelters are very rare, so I hope you will try to preserve yours. My home page contains links to photos of the dozen or so shelters that are known to have survived the last 80 years.  I would be delighted if you would send me photos so that I can feature it on this website.  Your local historical society may also be interested to hear if it.  And local schools might be very keen to arrange visits.

I am sorry that I am not aware of any organisation that can help you financially or practically.  But preserving or even rebuilding your shelter should not be difficult if you or your friends have basic practical skills. Indeed, lots of ordinary households built their own shelters during the war with material provided by the authorities

You will find information about how to repair and preserve your shelter on this web page.  Please do not ask me for advice as I do not have any information or advice beyond what is on that page. But I would of course be glad to add any of your tips or useful experience that is not already on that page.

Second, is the shelter still in its its original wartime location, dug into the ground or set in a concrete base, but also reinforced or covered by concrete? 

These shelters are also very rare, so I hope you will try to preserve yours. My home page contains links to photos of a number of such shelters that are known to have survived the last 80 years.  Your local historical society may also be interested to hear if it.  And local schools might be very keen to arrange visits.  But please do not send me any photos or other information as these shelters are not primary subject of this website.  You may, however, like to join the Facebook Group 'Anderson Shelter in your Garden'.

I am sorry that I am not aware of any organisation that can help you preserve your shelter, either financially or practically. 

You should also take care if renovating the shelter yourself as the concrete roofs are very heavy!

Third, was your shelter recycled or re-used after the war? - often turned into a garden shed, for instance?  If so, then it is still a very interesting structure, which you might like to preserve.  You can access photos of other recycled shelters via my home page. But please do not send me any further examples.  You might instead like to join the Facebook Group 'Anderson Shelter in your Garden'.

The corrugated iron that was used in the war, especially in Anderson Shelters, was significantly thicker (heavier gauge) than that which is manufactured today - around 2mm thick rather than the current 0.7mm.  It can be quite hard to find it these days so:- if you don't want to keep the corrugated iron, please don't throw it away but try to pass it on to others using eBay or Gumtree.   Or maybe advertise it via the Facebook Group 'Anderson Shelter in your Garden'?

And ... finally ... as other commitments make it difficult for me to keep this site up-to-date, I would be pleased to hear from you if you might be interested in helping me edit this site.

Martin Stanley